Come See TACO Marine at the 2018 IBEX Show in Booth 1433!

We’re exhibiting in booth 1433 at the 2018 IBEX Show in Tampa, Florida Oct. 2 – 4. IBEX is the largest marine industry trade event in North America, specializing in boat building, design, repair, maintenance and new product innovation.

This year, we will showcase the latest products across our core categories in Rub Rail, Sport Fishing equipment, Seating & Pedestals, including the new Sport Helm Chairs, LED Lighting, specialty hardware and our expanded line of Ratchet Hinges.

Additionally, we are displaying several new products, including the Boca Sport Helm Chair, Canvas Sun Shade Poles, Flex Chrome Rub Rails, Ratchet Hinges and our new Pro Series Grand Slam Mounts and Carbon Fiber Poles.

TACO IBEX Booth 1433
We’re exhibiting at IBEX in booth 1433 in Tampa, Florida Oct. 2 – 4.

As a family-owned and operated company that has been in business for nearly 60 years, we’re proud to continually meet the demands of an ever-changing market by providing full service solutions from design, engineering and manufacturing to inventory management and J.I.T. Delivery.

For more information on all our TACO products, visit our Web site tacomarine.comand follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagramand YouTube.

Important Boat Safety Tips Ahead of Hurricane Florence

As Hurricanes Florence makes it way toward the east coast of the United States, we are reminded how important it is to heed the warnings of the National Hurricane Center and prepare for emergency.

While it may not always be possible to remove boats from the water, there are precautions you can take to prepare your boat ahead of a major storm.

BOATS IN WATER

Whenever possible, choose a marina or dock that has some protection from the elements, such as a barrier island or an inland river away from the coast. Also, docks with high pilings can also provide added protection from storm surge.

BoatUs states that floating docks with high pilings tend to fair better during major storms than those without. But keep in mind, BoatUs recommends looking for pilings as tall as 18 feet.

“Floating docks allow boats to rise and fall with surge without stretching and stressing lines,” BoatUs states. “There have been instances where boats at floating docks have been largely unaffected by hurricanes, while some boats at nearby marinas with fixed docks were badly damaged.”

Captain Mark Henderson from the Liquid Fire Fishing Team, who is based in North Carolina (one of the states Florence is predicted to hit), said removing loose items on the boat is important.

Captain Mark Henderson from the Liquid Fire Fishing Team advises boaters to remove anything not permanently attached to a boat ahead of a major storm.

“Anything that is not truly attached, such as cushions and Isinglass, should be removed so it doesn’t get destroyed,” he said. “Isinglass will be blown out.”

Henderson said store loose items in a hatch or on land somewhere in a safer location.

If your boat is moored, check with your harbormaster to see if the mooring is helical – a corkscrew-like mooring that is screwed into the seafloor.

Unlike traditional mushroom and dead-weight mooring anchors, a BoatUs Foundation study found that helical mooring anchors withstood more pull during major storms.

Illustration from ABC Diving. www.abcdiving.com.

“A 500-pound buried mushroom anchor could be pulled out with 1,200 pounds of pull (supplied by a 900-hp tug); an 8,000-pound dead weight (concrete) anchor could be pulled out with 4,000 pounds of pull,” reports BoatUs. “A helical anchor, however, could not be pulled out and the strain gauge recorded 12,000 pounds of pull — its maximum — before a shackle burst apart. (In an earlier test with a larger tug, a strain gauge registered 20,800 pounds before the hawser snapped.)”

BOATS ON LAND

If you can remove your boat from the water, there are various storage options to consider.

BoatUs said dry-stack storage facilities built after 1992 are great options for storing boats during major storms. Dry-stack facilities constructed after Hurricane Andrew are more likely to have stronger structural supports and be able to withstand winds as high as 140 mph. However, BoatUs recommends considering the age of the dry-stack facility, with older buildings at a higher risk for damage.

For Henderson, he is storing his SeaVee 390z with quad engines in the center of an open field with no trees or structures nearby. If this is an option for you, Henderson recommends keeping your boat on its trailer, securely tied and anchored to land.

Henderson’s SeaVee 390z, which is normally stored on a trailer, will be anchored to land in the middle of a field with no trees or structures nearby during Hurricane Florence. Photo courtesy of the Liquid Fire Fishing Team.

“A lot of people tie them down, anchored to the trailer with three straps,” he said. “That way, they can’t blow off the trailer.”

Henderson added that boats, whether in water or on land, should have all antennas down and outrigger poles stowed.

For more information on how you can prepare for a major storm, check out this video from West Marine.

For more information on Hurricane Florence, follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

ChaseN’Tailz Charity Tournament Expecting 165 Boats Sept. 8

An estimated 165 boats are slated to compete in this year’s ChaseN’Tailz Fishing Tournament Sept. 8 – a Florida charity event created in memory of Chase Warren and dedicated to helping families with children who have rare diseases.

The story of ChaseN’Tailz began Oct. 1, 2012, when Chase Edward Warren was born – a dream come true for parents Summer and Jay, who struggled for years to conceive. While baby Chase first appeared healthy and normal, signs that something was wrong quickly began to surface.

Chase Edward Warren passed away Aug. 7, 2013 from Gaucher Type 2 – a rare neurological disease.

In the 10 months that followed Chase’s birth, he lost his ability to move, his organs became enlarged and his breathing labored. Meanwhile, doctors were stumped at the cause because his symptoms were so varied and severe.

Baby Chase passed away Aug. 7, 2013. Two days later, he was officially diagnosed with Gaucher Type 2 – a rare neurological disorder that has no treatment or cure.

Formerly called Infantile Gaucher Disease, the Gauchers Association describes Type 2 as a rare, rapidly progressing disease that affects the brain, spleen, liver, lungs and bones.

“Fewer than 1 in 100,000 newborn babies have Type 2 disease,” states the Gauchers Association. “Babies usually appear normal at birth but develop symptoms by the age of 3 to 6 months.”

As fishing and boating enthusiasts who own Canvas & Towers in Lake Park, Florida, Summer and Jay wanted to host a marine-based event in honor of Chase. In 2013, they launched ChaseN’Tailz Fishing Tournament – helping to spread awareness about rare diseases and raise funds for research and support.

“Most of these diseases are closely related and research for one greatly impacts 16 others,” writes Summer on the foundation’s Web site chasentailz.com. Summer and Jay have since had a daughter, who is a healthy 2-year-old.

Now in its fifth consecutive year, ChaseN’Tailz has donated more than $120,000 toward research and also to deserving families and organizations.

In addition to the popular fishing tournament, ChaseN’Tailz also hosts four smaller events throughout the year, including a youth painting class, a Calavares Cantina party, the tournament kick-off party and a fundraising booth at the Palm Beach International Boat Show.

On the day of the tournament, ChaseN’Tailz hosts a free community festival, which includes a silent auction, raffle, waterslide, games, vendors, a car show, food and drinks.

An aerial view of the tournament-day festival in 2017.

This year, TACO President Jon Kushner arranged for the marine manufacturing company to donate a pair of Grand Slam Outrigger Mounts and Tele-Outrigger Poles, a rigging kit, filet table and poly tumbler holders to the ChaseN’Tailz silent auction.

“The charity is in honor of Chase Warren, a child who passed at an unfortunately early age, similar to the I’M LOGAN IT Foundation,” said Kushner, whose nephew Logan passed away in 2012.

Kushner first met Jay at the 2017 Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show during the TACO Marine Project Boat Raffle Fundraiser for charity.

“Chase’s family is similar to ours, a marine industry family,” said Kushner, “so the charity and their passions are very parallel to ours.”

This year, Summer said some of the money raised through ChaseN’Tailz will go directly to the families in need who have a child with a rare, life-threatening disease – helping to pay medical bills, utilities, mortgages and other expenses.

Another benefactor is the Quantum House, located on the campus of St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, Florida. The Quantum House provides a safe haven for families to stay whose children are receiving treatment for serious medical conditions. ChaseN’Tailz has helped support the Quantum House since the tournament’s inception in 2013.

“The Warrens, as well as their extended family and friends, have provided a meal each year for our 30 families (75 people) who reside at Quantum House, in memory of their son, Chase Warren,” wrote Megan Thompson, Quantum House manager of family programs and operations, in a statement to TACO Marine. “These meals mean so much to our families who are going through traumatic situations with a child, either in the hospital or receiving medical treatment.”

ChaseN’Tailz also helps support the Live Like Jake Foundation, which promotes drowning awareness and water safety in memory of Jake Morrison, who passed away in a drowning accident in 2013.

“We have been able to provide 61 scholarships for the [Infant Swimming Resource] self rescue swim lessons in 2018 right here in Palm Beach County,” wrote Keri Morrison, founder of Live Like Jake, in a statement to TACO Marine. “Drowning is the leading cause of death in children 1 to 4 years old, with five deaths last year just in Palm Beach County.”

For Summer and Jay, supporting families with children who have a rare disease and organizations in need through ChaseN’Tailz is a way to keep the memory of Chase alive.

“As a grieving parent, your biggest fear is that your child will be forgotten,” said Summer. “This name ensured that wouldn’t happen.”

Anglers can still register to compete in ChaseN’Tailz from now through Sept. 6 at the Captain’s Meeting. To learn more and donate, visit chasentailz.com.

The Warren family.

Charity Fishing Tournament Raised $30,000 in Two Days!

Nearly 100 captains and their crew competed in the 4th annual Anglers For The Cure on Aug. 11 – reeling in more than $30,000 for prostate cancer awareness and research in just two days!

Tournament founder Adriana Somberg, who organized the first ever Anglers For The Cure in 2014, said 92 boats competed in this year’s event, compared to 65 in 2017.

Tournament founder Adriana Somberg, center, with guests and participants of the 4th annual Anglers For The Cure.

READ ALL ABOUT THE TOURNAMENT’S HISTORY HERE.

Additionally, 77 men received a free Complete Male Panel screening test during the Captain’s Meeting Aug. 9 – a service donated by One Lab in Boca Raton, Florida and supplemented by the charity.

Men lining up during the Captain’s Meeting to receive their free Complete Male Panel blood test, donated by One Lab.

The Complete Male Panel not only screens for the Prostate Specific Antigen [PSA], the most common indicator for prostate cancer, but also tested various other functions, including but not limited to a Complete Blood Count [CBC], a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel [CMP] and the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone [TSH].

“The men lining up for the testing was by far the most gratifying for me,” said Somberg, who lost her husband, Reed, to prostate cancer in 2014 – an outcome she aims to prevent for others by promoting earlier detection, awareness and research for a cure.

All 77 men who were tested are slated to receive their Complete Male Panel results sometime this week.

Somberg said more than 350 competitors and guests attended the Captain’s Meeting and tournament-day festivities, which had events leadings up to and during the weigh-in that included a raffle and silent auction.

For the silent auction, TACO Marine donated a pair of Aluminum Tele-Outrigger Poles, and other goodies for the Captain’s Buckets.

Each participating boat received one Captain’s Bucket.

“We’re very proud to be a contributing sponsor to Anglers For The Cure and were glad they had a successful tournament,” said TACO VP of Sales & Marketing Mike Kushner. “They are doing so much good within the community. Causes like this are ones that we’re thrilled to be a part of.”

While the tournament’s fiscal year is not yet over, Somberg estimates the charity will raise between $90,000 and $100,000 for prostate cancer research and awareness.

Somberg standing with a group of tournament participants and their fresh-caught Mahi Mahi.

“I will be hopefully doing other small fundraisers and collecting more funds,” said Somberg.

2018 benefactors include the Prostate Cancer Foundation, TrustBridge, ZERO – The End of Prostate Cancer and Treasure Health. For more information about prostate cancer and when men should be tested, read here.

To donate to and read more about the charity and this year’s tournament winners, visit anglersforthecure.com.

Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat Recaps Season in Final Episode

We’re back with the final episode of the season for Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat.

In episode 13, Florida Sportsman Boating Editor George LaBonte and Marine Customs Unlimited Owner Brian O’Donnell look back on their favorite project boats.

The 31-foot Contender was a fan favorite, LaBonte said, with a lot of people commenting and e-mailing about the stunning remodel.

The 31-foot Contender Better Dayz before it was remodeled by the team at MCU.

What initially began as a fuel tank replacement morphed into a complete overhaul from inside the hull to the engines, paint, deck, upholstery, dash panel and brand new TACO Rub Rail.

The 31-foot Contender was redone and looked like a totally different boat, complete with TACO Rub Rail to compliment the custom hull paint.

Another favorite was the 21-foot Paramount, which came into the MCU shop in dire need of a complete rehab.

The 21-foot Paramount was in rough shape when it got to the team at MCU.

Beginning in the stringers, the team at MCU cut the cap down, repainted the hull and installed new Power-Poles, a new stereo system and brand new TACO Rub Rail with a Stainless-Steel Insert and LED Navigation Lights.

The 21-foot Paramount looked amazing. The TACO Rub Rail with a Stainless-Steel Insert and LED Navigation Lights tied the custom hull paint and deck together.

The 19-foot Cuda Craft for Capt. Ron in the Florida Keys was also a notable project for the team at MCU.

The 19-foot Cuda Craft came to MCU because it had a rotten fuel tank.

Originally, the boat came to the shop to repair a rotten fuel tank, but further issues were discovered as the team commenced work. They also replaced the deck, remodeled the center console, installed custom live wells and refitted an Engel cooler as a seat in place of the Leaning Post.

Once finished, the Cuda Craft was almost an entirely new boat and perfect for fishing in the Florida Keys.

Watch the exclusive clip about these boats below.

Watch the full episode 13 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat below.

For all things TACO Marine, visit our Web site and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter.

Take a Cruise to the Florida Keys in Ep. 12 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat

In episode 12 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat, Brian from Marine Customs Unlimited makes one final change to the 19-foot Cuda Craft and also shows a quick fix to repair a stiff steering wheel.

CUDA CRAFT

Originally, the 19-foot Cuda Craft came to the shop at Marine Customs Unlimited for a fuel tank repair. But after further inspection, it was clear the boat needed some major repairs. After re-bonding the stringers, replacing the fuel tanks and deck, remodeling the center console and installing two custom live wells, the Cuda Craft was returned to Capt. Ron in the Florida Keys.

However, after having the boat back home for a few weeks, Capt. Ron decided he wanted to replace the leaning post with something less bulky and more practical. So Brian from MCU came up with a great solution for the Cuda Craft.

Capt. Ron decided the leaning post was too bulky for the 19-foot Cuda Craft.

Watch the exclusive clip below to see what Brian put in place of the leaning post.


SAILFISH

Up next, MCU Master Technician Dave Singer brought his 2006 23-foot Sailfish into the shop to fix a sticky steering wheel.

After removing parts of the outboards, Dave brought some extreme heat to warm up the old grease inside the steering shaft.
While heating up the steering shaft, you need to simultaneously move the outboard back and forth to help get the old grease out.
Once the old grease is out, put new, premium-quality grease inside.

Learn how you can do this quick fix in the exclusive clip below.

Watch the full episode 12 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat below.

Stay up to date on all things Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

We’re Back with Episode 11 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat

Watch the shocking conclusion to the 31-foot Contender remodeling project in episode 11 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat!

The 31-foot Contender Better Dayz before it was completely remodeled.

Originally, the Contender “Better Dayz” needed new fuel tanks, but after a hurricane damaged other areas of the boat, the crew at Marine Customs Unlimited set to work on a host of other tasks, including painting the hull, remodeling the dash and installing brand new black TACO Rub Rail with a Stainless-Steel Insert.

The 31-foot Contender after it was completely remodeled, featuring brand new black TACO Rub Rail with a Stainless-Steel Insert.

Better Dayz also had a new Armstrong Nautical Products bracket mounted on the transom, new twin Yamaha 300s mounted on the bracket, a new Armstrong ladder, a completely rebuffed deck with new nonskid, custom diamond-stitched upholstery and new Pacer Group wiring.

On the water, the 31-foot Contender was like a brand new boat, complete with TACO Grand Slam Outriggers.

Watch the exclusive clip below.

Episode 11 also takes viewers onboard a completely remodeled 28-foot classic 1969  Cary Sportsman boat.

This is what the 28-foot 1969 Cary Sportsman boat looked like before Tim McKernan began the remodeling project.

Five years ago, Miami resident Tim McKernan wanted a project boat he could remodel for some family outings and fishing excursions. What was intended as a summer-long hobby morphed into a five-year adventure that resulted in the McKernan’s having a one-of-a-kind boating and fishing  masterpiece.

One of the new features to the Cary Sportsman is the center console and T-Top, which also has TACO Grand Slam Outriggers.
The completely remodeled 28-foot 1969 Cary Sportsman is a truly unique boat.

While keeping some of the boat’s original charm, such as the cabin, McKernan completely revamped the Cary Sportsman all the way from the stringers to the new Armstrong bracket and outboard engines. He also outfitted the once-dual consoled boat with a center console and T-top, complete with TACO Grand Slam Outrigger systems.

Watch the exclusive clip below.

And check out the full episode 11 of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat below.

For more Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat updates and everything else TACO Marine, subscribe to this blog and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

Charity Fishing Tournament Angling to Save Lives Through Early Prostate Cancer Detection & Awareness

After prostate cancer claimed the life of her husband, Reed, of 29 years, Adriana Somberg launched the charity fishing tournament Anglers For The Cure – providing life-saving PSA blood tests for men and research funding to find a cure for the disease.

Reed and Adriana Somberg.

The Somberg’s story begins in 1985 when the pair met at a Miami job interview, where Reed ultimately hired his future wife as his legal secretary. Over the years, the outdoorsy couple did everything together, including their mutual passion for boating, fishing and just about anything to do with the water.

In 2009 when Reed, then 54, went to the doctor for a routine physical exam, his bloodwork showed an elevated prostate-specific antigen [PSA] – blood markers primarily used to screen for prostate cancer. He was eventually diagnosed with the disease and completed radiation therapy, but the cancer returned and had metastasized to his bones.

Reed passed away on May 22, 2014 at the age of 59.

Despite no family history and being at peak health, Adriana believes Reed would still be alive today if he had his PSA screening much earlier in life. The American Cancer Society recommends men begin having PSA tests at age 50. For men with a higher-than-average risk, it is recommended they begin testing at age 45.

A few months after Reed’s passing, Adriana competed in Bluewater Babes Fish for a Cure – an all-female fishing tournament to raise money for Florida breast and ovarian cancer patients in financial need.

“That’s when I woke up and said I wanted to do something for the guys,” said Adriana, who immediately began planning the first tournament.

“I had zero experience doing the fundraisers or any kind of charity event,” added Adriana, who began cold calling fishing magazines and marine manufacturers for donations and sponsorships after launching the non-profit.

In Oct. 2014, Adriana launched the first ever Anglers For The Cure tournament in West Palm Beach, Florida – raising a staggering $45,000 for prostate cancer research and awareness.

“Reed and I had spent years just fishing and scuba diving,” said Adriana, who organized a fishing tournament because she knew it was something her late husband would have enjoyed.

Now in its fourth consecutive year, Adriana hopes to break $100,000 at this year’s event August 11.

The inaugural tournament had 33 boats and 80 sponsors. After growing steadily each year, Adriana said she expects roughly 75 boats and close to 120 sponsors for this year’s tournament.

In 2017 at the Miami International Boat Show, Adriana met TACO VP Mike Kushner, who was, at the time, showcasing the TACO Marine Project Boat, which was eventually raffled for charity. After learning about Reed and Anglers For The Cure, Kushner said he wanted to support Adriana’s fundraiser.

“I think every male needs to get checked when you reach a certain age,” said Kushner. “Prostate cancer is one of those things that it’s so easily preventable if caught early.”

Because so many TACO Marine fans – fishing and boating enthusiasts – are men, Kushner said Anglers For The Cure was a great, local event for the Miami-based company to support.

This year, TACO donated a pair of Aluminum Tele-Outrigger Poles, which are slated as one of the silent auction items during the fishing tournament.

Last year, for the first time in the tournament’s history, every man who attended the Captain’s Meeting had the option of receiving a free PSA screening test – a service donated by One Lab in Boca Raton, Florida.

One Lab in Boca Raton, Florida donated free PSA screening tests for all men who attended the Captain’s Meeting during the 2017 tournament.

Of the 57 men who had a free PSA screening at last year’s event, two discovered they had prostate cancer.

“They would not have found out had it not been for them participating,” said Adriana.

Finholder and More Founder John Adinolfe was one of the men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer, which was discovered early stage.

Because he had his PSA tested during the Anglers For the Cure Captain’s Meeting in 2017, Adinolfe knew his levels had spiked when he had a blood test again in early 2018, which showed an elevated PSA.

John Adinolfe with Adriana, center, and his wife, Michele, during the 2017 Anglers For The Cure tournament.

“I would like to thank Adriana Somberg and Anglers For the Cure for making me aware of the importance of knowing your PSA score,” said Adinolfe, who is currently in treatment. “Her message is loud and clear: Get tested. Early detection is the key to your survival.”

Because of the support of One Lab, Adriana plans to not only continue with the free screening at this year’s Captain’s Meeting, but will offer a more comprehensive male panel blood test Aug. 9, when the meeting takes place.

“If 100 guys line up and get it done, that’s OK with me,” said Adriana, who will donate a portion of the event proceeds to pay for the advanced prostate screening. “I want to provide that test to them.”

2018 benefactors also include the Prostate Cancer Foundation, TrustBridge, ZERO – The End of Prostate Cancer and Treasure Health.

For men everywhere, Adriana has one simple reminder.

“Prostate cancer is not an old man’s disease,” she said. “Early detection is key to living a long and healthy life with prostate cancer. It’s a simple blood test.”

For more information on the tournament, visit anglersforthecure.com. For more information on prostate cancer, visit the American Cancer Society at cancer.org.

Introducing the NEW Transom Cross Tie Cleat XL

Boaters rejoice! We’ve designed the next best thing for easy docking.

Introducing our new Transom Cross Tie Cleat XL – keeping your lines organized and elevated when the dock’s surface drops below the tops of your motor cowlings.

The new Transom Cross Tie Cleat XL is 40-inches long and constructed with a brushed aluminum finish.

The patent-pending locking mechanism allows for a secure cleat that is easy to reach, remove and reinstall. You’ll never have to find a place to tie off at the stern when docking again! These cleats are also great for hanging fenders and chum bags.

As seen in this photo, tying off at the dock without the Transom Cross Tie Cleat XL causes lines to drape over motor cowlings and props – a potentially hazardous and damaging scenario.
When employing the Transom Cross Tie Cleat XLs at the dock, lines are organized and elevated above motor cowlings and props, which is safer.

With a 15-degree large S-shape design, these cleats fit into standard rod holders 1-7/8-inches in diameter. The large loop hole accommodates line up to 5/8-inch thick.

When not in use, simply apply pressure, push down, twist and remove the cleat from the gunnel. Safely stow the cleats in the included mesh bag, even when wet.

These cleats are slated for marine distributor availability by the end of 2018 and available at marine retailers in the New Year. For questions, comments or more information on the Transom Cross Tie Cleat XL, fill out the contact form below.

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It’s Time for Another Episode of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat!

We’re back with another episode of Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat!

In episode 10, the crew at Marine Customs Unlimited get back to work on the 19-foot Cuda Craft. First, Austin was tasked with installing new rod holders throughout the gunnel. The catch? Because of the boat’s design and the location of the new rod holders, great care was needed to ensure the holders were angled correctly to protect the hull.

This 19-foot Cuda Craft had some major repairs done at Marine Customs Unlimited. Now it was time for custom rod holders and live well plumbing.
It was key that the angle and placement of each custom rod holder was carefully placed to ensure the hull would not be damaged.
Once accurately placed, the new custom rod holders seamlessly fit into the Cuda Craft gunnel.

Up next, the Cuda Craft was sent to Steve for some custom rigging on two live wells. To properly rig the live wells, Steve had to ensure he drilled the correctly sized hole for the high speed pickup for each live well. These are designed to flow fresh water into the live well without continually running a pump.

Steve then attached a ball valve on top of the pickup, which provides added protection against water leaks if a pump breaks.

Steve drilling the holes for the new high speed pickup for each live well.
The high speed pickups allow for fresh water to flow into the live well without the continual use of a pump.
Steve attached a ball valve on top of each pickup. Having a ball valve will protect the boat from leaks, should a pump break.

Steve then plumbs a spray head and overflow drain for each live well. He has some great tips to consider for boaters installing their own live wells. After the plumbing is complete, Steve installs aerators into each live well, which help keep bait alive and healthy.

Steve then installs a spray head and overflow drain into each live well.
The final touch to the new live wells was installing an aerator pump for each.
Proper aeration helps keep bait alive, healthy and active for fishing.

Watch the exclusive clip below.

In this episode, we also learn about one man’s dreamboat – a 25-foot Mako – and watch as Steve rigs a pair of self-leveling trim tabs on a classic Boston Whaler. We also see the amazing conclusion to the 19-foot Cuda Craft!

One Man’s Dreamboat features a 25-foot Mako.
This Boston Whaler gets self-leveling trim tabs.
The Cuda Craft is complete!

Watch the full episode below.

For the latest updates on Florida Sportsman Project Dreamboat and all things TACO Marine, subscribe to this blog and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

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